All posts by Cathleen Flahardy

From a high school mock trial to the GC seat of Dyson: Jason Brown

JLBrown 2015By the time Minneapolis-area native Jason Brown was in high school, he already knew he wanted to be a lawyer. During a civics class his sophomore year, Brown participated in a mock trial, in which he served as lead defense counsel. From preparing for trial and creating presentations to participating in deep strategic thinking and gaining skills that could serve to help those in need, Brown fell in love with the work and the idea he could actually make a living doing it.

Around that same time, Brown’s mother introduced him to an old childhood friend of hers who was a professor at Howard University in Washington, D.C. After the professor gave the 16-year-old a personal tour of the Howard campus, Brown fell in love again—this time with one of the country’s prestigious colleges.

Brown’s destiny was set. After high school, he attended Howard University—where he excelled as a student—and immediately upon graduation, went straight to Howard University School of Law. “Being an African American kid from the Twin Cities, it was a huge and strikingly sharp contrast to go from there to an historically black college that is so rich in history as Howard,” Brown says. “I jumped at the chance to do something that would be different and challenging.” More 

Aim High: Career Advice from 4 Successful GCs

Evers-Legal-Executive-Recruiter-Dec17-Your-CareerThe role of general counsel is a coveted position for which many lawyers strive.. But the path to the GC seat varies greatly. While some highly successful general counsel cut their teeth in big law firms, others landed junior level in-house positions straight out of law school—and there are many other paths as well.

While there is no clear, defined career path to follow that will ensure lawyers with their sights on the top legal seat of a big company lands it, there are steps they can take and skill sets they can gain that will set them up for success.

Each year, we interview successful senior in-house counsel about their lives and careers, and we ask them what advice they would give a young lawyer who would like to become a GC someday. Last year, our GCs offered such great insights as develop emotional intelligence, do the work you love, and simply listen. Here’s a roundup of the suggestions our 2017 GC profile participants had for aspiring senior in-house counsel:  More 

Fast and furious: visionary and race car driver Jeff Carr continues driving change in the delivery of legal services

JWC OC picAs a young man growing up in Delaware, Jeff Carr was always hard at work. Whether he was fixing banged-up cars in his family’s body shop, refinishing beautiful pieces of furniture in his uncle’s artisan furniture store or preventing drownings as a lifeguard at the local pool, Carr was slowly and carefully developing skills that would become critical to his success as a legal department leader in the years to come.

Carr has a reputation among his GC peers as being a visionary in changing the way legal departments and law firms deliver legal services. “Innovators are only considered to be visionaries after they’re proven successful,” Carr says. “Before that, we were just thought of as crazy.”

In the early days, Carr’s out-of-the-box ideas may have seemed crazy, but before he retired after a long tenure in the GC seat of Fortune 500 company FMC Technologies, Carr worked for years with law associations and other forward thinkers to shape the way legal departments partnered with law firms and bought legal services—not only helping put the terms “alternative fee arrangement” and “fixed fee” on the legal services map, but also creating efficiencies within the legal department world that previously didn’t exist. More 

From Brazil to America: Talita Ramos Erickson, Barilla America’s GC

Talita Erickson cropped RGBEver since she was a child, Talita Erickson has had a passion for culture, diversity and the global experience. She grew up in Brazil, near the border of Argentina and Paraguay near Iguazu Falls, a national park that attracts tourists from around the world. This unique childhood piqued her curiosity—and woke the world traveler inside of her.

As she graduated high school, as is custom in Brazil, Erickson had to decide her life’s profession before entering college. She was only 17 years old and unsure what she wanted to do, but she knew she wanted to be able to direct—and, if necessary redirect—her career any way that might make sense to her. Following in her older brother’s footsteps, Erickson chose a career in law.

“A law degree is very flexible,” she says. “If you’re passionate about sports, you can be a sports attorney. Or in my case, if you love food, you can go to work in the food industry. A law degree gives you the flexibility to work in any industry you want.” More 

From managing a factory line to being GC of Potbelly, Matt Revord discusses his unique career

Evers-Legal-Executive-Search-Matt-Revord-QA-March-2017Born in Evanston, Ill., raised in downstate Indiana and Illinois, then back up to the Chicago area—Matt Revord is a Midwesterner through and through. So it seems fitting that he would be the general counsel of one of the most respected and recognized brands to come out of Chicago. But it took hard work and a few twists and turns before Revord landed at the helm of the legal department of Potbelly Sandwich Works.

In fact, Revord didn’t grow up knowing that one day he would be a lawyer. In high school, a friend’s father—noting Revord’s cunning argumentative skills—mentioned on several occasions that he should consider a career in law. The idea was appealing to Revord, but after graduating from Notre Dame, he couldn’t quite commit. Revord decided to take a year to work, think about his next move and save some money. His job opportunities were diverse, to say the least: a large insurance company, the CIA or a General Motor’s (GM) factory. More 

In Their Words: Career Advice from 9 Successful General Counsel

YourCareer-image-1024x768Throughout my tenure with Evers Legal, I have had the honor and privilege to chat with some of the most successful in-house lawyers in the business. In the past two years, I’ve interviewed a lawyer at the world’s largest retailer, two in the higher education field, and one from a well-known underwear brand, as well as several others from equally interesting industries.

Among this diverse group of professionals is years of exceptional legal and business experience. In every interview, I ask about the advice they would give a young lawyer hoping to be a general counsel someday. While several, consistent themes always rise to the surface, each one of these lawyers offers very personal and valuable advice from a unique perspective.

Here are some advice highlights from our 2015 and 2016 eNews GC profiles, when asked: What advice would you give a young lawyer who would like to be the GC of a company someday? More 

Karen Shaff is right at home as GC of Principal Financial

Shaff Picture April 2012 4x6Karen Shaff may not have known at an early age that she was destined to be a lawyer, but her family and friends did.

Shaff grew up in Clinton, Iowa, where she attended elementary and high school. Shaff decided to head to Northwestern University for her undergraduate degree and majored in political science.  “We used to travel to Chicago a lot when I was a kid, and I loved the city.  Being in the area along with being a top tier school, made Northwestern an easy choice,” she says of her decision to attend the prestigious Evanston, Ill.-based university.

But even by her senior year of college, Shaff was unsure what she wanted as a career, so she decided to take the LSAT. Possibly influenced by her lawyer father, she applied to and was accepted into Drake University Law School in Des Moines, Iowa. “At the time, I really hadn’t thought about going to law school,” she says. “But when I told my friends and family, they all just knew that would be my next step.” More 

Jockey’s General Counsel and his unconventional career path

200x200 As the SVP of human resources, general counsel and secretary of Jockey International, Mark Jaeger is right where he wants to be in his career. Growing up in the Chicago suburbs, Jaeger was a good student with an interest in business and law. As an undergrad at University of Iowa, Jaeger focused his studies on economics, but he knew he wanted to become a lawyer. So after completing his undergraduate studies, Jaeger headed straight to law school—attending Southern Illinois University.

But from there, Jaeger’s career path didn’t follow that of today’s typical general counsel. Unlike most GCs, who typically spend a few years in a law firm before crossing over to the business side, Jaeger landed an in-house gig right out of law school, at manufacturing company Roper Corp. in Kankakee, Ill.

“I wasn’t targeting in-house positions at that point,” Jaeger explains. “I was just looking for opportunities to practice law close to my hometown of Chicago.” More 

A Winding Path: Bill Caruso’s Journey to DeVry’s Legal Department

Head shotFor F. Willis (Bill) Caruso Jr., law was in his blood. Both of his parents, his mother’s parents, and several siblings and extended family members were all lawyers he admired as he grew up in the west suburbs of Chicago. It seemed he was destined to be a lawyer, but Caruso had his sights set on a different career—medicine.

However, once he entered the University of Wisconsin for undergrad and started pursuing the classes that would lead him to medical school, his affinity for the field waned. Despite the fact that he had always excelled in math and science, organic chemistry—a requirement for any pre-med program—just wasn’t working out for him. So he shifted his focus to the obvious one: law. And it just clicked. More 

Alan Bryan Finds Career Satisfaction at the World’s Largest Retailer

Alan Bryan April eNews Career Satisfaction at Walmart Evers Legal Counsel Q&AGrowing up in small town Morrilton, Arkansas, Alan Bryan always thought he’d be a doctor. It was a clear path—and one that made sense for Bryan, who excelled academically in middle school and high school, and loved the idea of spending his life helping people.

But when Bryan landed at University of Arkansas and started defining his skill set, becoming a doctor seemed less appealing. “I came to the realization that I was not thrilled about working in hospitals — and that can be pretty important in the medical field — so I changed course,” he says. “It hit me that I was really better-suited to help people and businesses through persuasiveness and problem-solving, and not so much in the medical context.” More