Crain’s article: M&A impact on in-house counsel positions

Hmm… I think I come across a bit grouchy. We do, after all, work with a lot of in-house counsel who are displaced post-merger and I do feel the pain from folks who do not land softly and quickly. But there really is a huge glass half full element here: Companies truly like candidates in this situation, because the reason for seeking new employment is very “clean” and completely unrelated to performance or perceived dissatisfaction.

Anyway, it’s always fun to be quoted in Crain’s and, most importantly, I do think this is an important topic worthy of discussion.

 

Full-time, well-paid secondment opening

Our client is a Fortune 500 company in the western suburbs of Chicago. Immediate opening for a senior level attorney who can run with large scale projects. This company is addressing assessment of Independent Contractor versus Employee status on a major scale, on a state-by-state basis. There is a variety of interesting legal work to be done and managed related to this core issue. The role is ongoing with the potential (but we cannot promise) of direct hire conversion down the road. Our pay rate for this will be very strong.

The ideal background:  a senior level in-house commercial generalist with project management and issue spotting skills. Specific experience with independent contractor related issues a plus, of course, but not absolutely required. A generalist with litigation management, exposure to employment law, and commercial experience would do well.

Please email mhaydon@everslegal.com with your questions and interest level.

Mattersight GC finds satisfying career in the technology sector

C.CarsenGrowing up an only child to hard-working parents in a small Midwest town, Christine Carsen excelled in school and set her dreams high. Taking note that the most successful people in her hometown donned either the title of “doctor” or “lawyer,” Carsen decided she would make a career out of one of these two respected professions.

When Carsen landed at University of Iowa, she first tried her hand as a pre-med student, but decided it wasn’t for her. Because the university didn’t have a pre-law program, Carsen immediately shifted gears to major in history, with a specific intent on going into law. More 

Pro bono at work: LCBH offers lawyers an opportunity to give back

YourCareerimageLast month, I discussed why it’s important, when possible, for lawyers to volunteer for pro bono work. In summary, pro bono helps your career in three ways:  it enhances your skill sets, offers opportunities to build relationships within the legal community and beyond, and allows you to demonstrate leadership skills.

Understanding the role pro bono plays in your career is the first step. Finding the right pro bono opportunities for you is the next. No doubt, you will be guided by your individual beliefs and likely target organizations that are doing work you strongly support.   More 

As more companies put legal recruiting in the hands of HR, help me help them

Culture Fit (Oct) art“I would like to use you, but our HR team is in charge of the opening,” a general counsel we respect and have known for years said to me during a recent phone call. This is not a new development, of course. Many organizations fill law department positions without using any outside search firm. But not too long ago, the law department always took charge of selecting the search firm when, indeed, the company decided to use one. Accordingly, we have focused for 20 years on building relationships with you—lawyers and law department leaders.

However, our firm is not well known within HR circles. I intend to change that. By building relationships with HR leaders, I hope we will earn the right to serve more of your law department’s needs. The challenge is getting in front of the right people for introductory meetings in advance of needs arising. Like all executives, HR leaders resist unsolicited inquiries. More 

Congratulations Aaron Goodman

Congratulations to Aaron Goodman!  Aaron recently won a long-term insourcing engagement with our client Re:Sources USA.  Aaron’s background includes five years with Kirkland & Ellis and two years of in-house counsel experience with Orbitz.

If your law department might benefit from a non-headcount insourcing solution, please give us a call for details.

Rich Veys’ winding career path led him to the GC seat at Society of Actuaries

Rich VeysRich Veys knew one thing when he was entering college: He was going to be an engineer. As a high school student, he excelled in math and science, so his obvious course of action was to follow in the footsteps of his dad and older brother, both of whom were engineers.

But once the Omaha-native arrived at the University of Nebraska and began studying political science, he developed an interest in social issues. “It was the early 1970s, and there was a lot more social consciousness at the time,” Veys explains. “Social issues were huge.”

It was at that point that his focus began to shift from engineering to public policy. As he approached graduation, higher education in engineering was off the table and Veys found himself deciding between a master’s degree in public administration and juris doctorate. A year and a half later, he landed at the University of Illinois College of Law and started down the path that would lead him from Omaha to Chicago to Ohio and back to Chicago, touching computer technology, equipment leasing, management consulting and consumer products industries all along the way. More 

The art of giving: 3 Reasons pro bono work is excellent for your career

YourCareerimageJust because you’re a busy lawyer in a bustling legal department doesn’t mean pro bono work isn’t an option for you.  Pro bono isn’t just for the law firm lawyers.  In fact, quite the opposite is true.

Over the years, I’ve talked to countless in-house counsel who set aside time to take on pro bono projects—and, not coincidentally, these lawyers tend to be the most satisfied (and successful) in their careers.

Sure, pro bono work feels good. Helping people who are unable to afford legal services they may desperately need—such as writing a will, fighting an eviction or foreclosure proceeding, or handling complicated immigration paperwork, to name a few—is something most lawyers enter law school assuming they would do. But when “life happens,” it’s easy to put pro bono work on the back burner. More 

Compliance, Compliance, Compliance

CultureFitimageShould a general counsel also hold the chief compliance officer (CCO) title? Associations that have sprung up in support of the CCO function say definitely no and advocate for a direct reporting relationship between a CCO and CEO, while other experts believe there are strong benefits to combining these roles.

Objective research offers insight into how companies are actually approaching the topic.

And that is: There is no one-size-fits-all answer to this question. A Deloitte survey—released earlier this year, and the best stats I could find on the topic—states that only 17 percent of CCOs also hold the GC title. More 

Congratulations Amy Sohl

Congratulations to Amy Sohl, who starts as Senior Counsel with IRi Worldwide on September 15th.  Amy had been at IRi on assignment via our insourcing platform for six months, and we are very happy to report this win-win outcome.  Amy’s background includes a JD from the University of Chicago, teeth cutting with Vedder Price, and several years in-house with BP.  Not too shabby, right?

I thank our VP of Recruiting, Meredith Haydon, for recommending Amy to IRi.